Who's Online Now
2 Legionnaires (Brain-Fall-Out Boy, Brain-Fall-Out Boy, Paladin), 0 Murran Spies and 13 Spider Guild Agents online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Television Trouble-Finder
Time-Scope
Star Trek:Discovery
by Brain-Fall-Out Boy. 09/25/17 06:07 PM
Inane One Word Posts XXX - keep it clean
by Legion Tracker. 09/25/17 06:05 PM
Birthday wishes to He Who Wanders
by Legion Tracker. 09/25/17 06:04 PM
More evidence of future LSH in CW Supergirl
by Legion Tracker. 09/25/17 05:34 PM
WR's Legion Pixels
by Harbinger. 09/25/17 02:33 PM
Answering Questions with Questions XVI
by Quislet, Esq. 09/25/17 02:24 PM
Kill this thread - one second edition
by Quislet, Esq. 09/25/17 02:23 PM
Universe-Monitor
DC Comics
Legion Wiki
LMBP Yahoo! Group
LMB Wiki
Facebook Legion World
Twitter Legion World
Legion at Cosmic Teams
Legion of Super-Bloggers
The Legion Omnicom
Legion Abstract
Year 3000 - Legion RP site
The Future Begins Now - Legion RP site
We Are Legion - Legion RP site
Unofficial Guide to the DC Universe - Legion
Mike's Amazing World of DC Comics - Legion
Legion of Super-Heroes Online Companion
Hero History at Major Spoilers
Interlac, the Legion of Super-Heroes APA Facebook group
Klordny: Devoted to the Legion of Super-Heroes
APA 247 Yahoo! Group
It's OK, I'm a Senator
Get-a-Life Boy's Legion of Super-Heroes Site
Titanstower
The Legion Files
Heaven4Heroes - Legion
Legion of Super-Heroes fanfic
Glamazonia presenta: Legione Dei Super-Eroi
Super Future Friends
Legion of Substitute Podcasters
Blockade Boy
The Legion of Super-Heroes - Kevin Leung's Original Comic Art Gallery
The Superhero Network Entertainment Group
Omnicom
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 5 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
#935929 - 08/13/17 10:06 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: He Who Wanders]  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 27,302
Paladin Online content
Paladin  Online Content


Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 27,302
The Underbelly of Society
Originally Posted by Hubes
"Hubes"? Hmm ... I've been He Who, Huey, HWW, even HHW on occasion. I'll have to add this to my nicknames. smile


Gotta keep you guessin', Hubes! lol Ask Ann (Landers wink ), I've branched out more than once with my nicknames for her! nod

Originally Posted by Hubes
I hadn't really thought about my transition into art criticism as a big deal, but it's nice of you to notice, Lardy. I don't think I've ever discounted the importance of art in comics, but, from a personal perspective, the writing is what matters most to me. However, I appreciate your feedback.


That's what I mean! My memory may be flawed, but I recall there being a time where you wouldn't have anything to say about the art. In short, I like that you're responding to some artistic observations and offering some thoughts on them, now, at the very least!


Still "Lardy" to my friends!
#935981 - 08/14/17 05:39 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: He Who Wanders]  
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Ann Hebistand Offline
Active
Ann Hebistand  Offline
Active

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Originally Posted by He Who Wanders
Originally Posted by Ann Hebistand


What's decidedly bitter for me is that, despite Bruce Patterson once again going above and beyond his remit as inker/finisher, Giffen once again proves to be the wrong kind of artist for these kinds of character-driven "interlude" scenes. I mean, the layouts have the odd flourish here and there, but the body language and the faces are just...functional. Ergo, I find myself missing Broderick already.


I see your point about the faces; there is a certain flatness to them. However, I think Giffen delivers emotion when he's called to. Some of my standout face shots include Dawny (page 8), Ayla (page 9), and Imra (p. 16). I also think he deserves credit for giving the Legionnaires individual features, which will develop further as the series continues.

As for body language, I didn't see any problems. Where did you feel it was off?



It's not so much that I feel the body language was badly done, but rather that there was a preponderance of generic poses and gestures, the kind which any halfway competent artist would have drawn. All nuances, subtleties, and distinctiveness in the faces, were entirely down to Patterson's inking...in my opinion. This all goes back to my inability to perceive this stage of Giffen's artistic evolution as anything better than average-quality imitations of the styles du jour circa 1982.

#935982 - 08/14/17 05:43 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Paladin]  
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Ann Hebistand Offline
Active
Ann Hebistand  Offline
Active

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Originally Posted by Paladin
Originally Posted by Hubes
"Hubes"? Hmm ... I've been He Who, Huey, HWW, even HHW on occasion. I'll have to add this to my nicknames. smile


Gotta keep you guessin', Hubes! lol Ask Ann (Landers wink ), I've branched out more than once with my nicknames for her! nod


Tee hee.

Originally Posted by Paladin
Originally Posted by Hubes
I hadn't really thought about my transition into art criticism as a big deal, but it's nice of you to notice, Lardy. I don't think I've ever discounted the importance of art in comics, but, from a personal perspective, the writing is what matters most to me. However, I appreciate your feedback.


That's what I mean! My memory may be flawed, but I recall there being a time where you wouldn't have anything to say about the art. In short, I like that you're responding to some artistic observations and offering some thoughts on them, now, at the very least!


I think one of the best things about these re-read threads is the way we challenge and inspire each other to reach beyond our comfort zones and look at things from perspectives we wouldn't have tried before.

#935984 - 08/14/17 09:52 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,741
Blacula Offline
Blacula  Offline


Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,741
Australia
I think LoSH # 289 has one of my top 5, possibly top 3, LoSH covers of all time.

#936019 - 08/16/17 06:48 AM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 15,346
Fat Cramer Offline
Fat Cramer  Offline


Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 15,346
Café Cramer
LSH Annual #1 Monster in a Little Girl’s Mind! by Paul Levitz, art by Keith Giffen & Bruce Patterson, colours Costanza, letters Laurie Sutton

[Linked Image]

Officer Shvaughn Erin arrives at Legion HA as the first SP Liason Officer. She gets the tour from Element Lad and observes Brainiac 5 treating a young girl, suffering from a rare energy-overload, in the medi-lab, assisted by Dream Girl and Mon-el and attended by the girl’s brother Jacques Foccart.
Brainy is using circuitry which previously caused serious harm and, once again, something goes awry and Computo comes to life in the child Danielle’s body.

Suddenly, computer and tech systems throughout the HQ attack Legionnaires. Outside, Earth is on full alert since Officer Erin managed to get a message out that Computo is active. The HQ is quarantined and the surrounding area evacuated. Various groups offer help – the Subs, the Green Lanterns – but are rebuffed. Reservist Luornu cannot bring herself to help and Chuck remains with her; Chameleon Boy mopes in a park, unaware of the disaster. The dark being that awakened several issues ago senses a power and dispatches a servant to investigate.

Computo taunts Brainiac 5 and Jacques Foccart. Brainy manages to slip Jacques a telepathic earplug and instructs him to take Lyle Norg’s invisibility serum, on the chance that it might give him powers which Computo would not expect. Jacques does this and does turn invisible, as Computo continues to wreak havoc and Chief Zendak reports on the disaster. Via telepathic earplug, Brainy communicates with an immobilized, weakened Mon-el and instructs him to open a storeroom with his heat vision to release a hypo disc, which invisible Jacques grabs and uses to sedate and disable Computo. The techno-attacks come to an abrupt end. Danielle is still alive, but must be kept unconscious to prevent Computo from awakening.

At an assembly of Legionnaires, Brainy explains the situation, apologizes, resigns and requests that Jacques Foccart replace him as the new Invisible Kid. Leader element lad rejects the resignation; the Legionnaires vote to admit Jacques as a new Legionnaire, who accepts. Brainy vows to cure Danielle.

Comments: This is an exciting, fast-paced, satisfying story with everyone but the Super-cousins (yay! - except for one panel showing Superboy in 1969, sensing “a sudden chill”). We get some glimpse into the personal lives and thoughts of each Legionnaire before disaster strikes them, which provides continuity with the events of previous issues. Computo arranges a great variety of creative attacks, made worse by the Legionnaires not realizing who/what is attacking them.

There’s a real sense of danger as the Science Police and Earthgov deal with the emergency. Shvaughn’s reports to Zendak at the top of each page illustrate how events are seen from outside the medical centre, which Computo barricaded. She suggests both nuking the HQ and evacuating the entire planet, which raises this event well above Computo’s Adventure-era attack. Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed and less drastic measures were taken by authorities outside Legion HQ.

Danielle looks truly possessed, with glowing eyes and drenched in sweat as her small physical body tries to cope with Computo. Newcomer Jacques is credible as her frantic brother, out of his depth, but willing to risk his own life to help his sister.

The two groups whose help is declined provide a brief comic moment (the Subs, ranked below the Super-Pets by the responding SP officer) and an untold, promised-for-the-future story of why Green Lanterns aren’t allowed on Earth.

Nobody comes off badly in this story, except possibly Chameleon Boy, who at least appears to be ready to face the consequences of his rash behaviour. There is a bit of an odd moment when Shadow Lass says that she never heard of Computo; something that important to Legion history would surely have been common knowledge of all members.

An unusually humble Brainy takes full responsibility for the mess. A very forgiving Element Lad takes the unilateral decision to reject his resignation. It’s a happy ending, with a promise of future threats: supposedly unconscious Danielle’s eyes open and glow red and the Dark Being is getting interested in Earth.

I expect Levitz and Giffen had as much fun creating this story as I had reading it.


Holy Cats of Egypt!
#936022 - 08/16/17 08:47 AM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 4,110
Dave Hackett Offline
Dave Hackett  Offline


Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 4,110
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
FC forgot the single biggest moment in this issue: The first appearance of Thom's beard!

#936024 - 08/16/17 09:06 AM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 15,346
Fat Cramer Offline
Fat Cramer  Offline


Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 15,346
Café Cramer
Hah! True - I guess he was so busy with D&D - and with Nura busy in the medi-centre - he didn't bother to shave.


Holy Cats of Egypt!
#936049 - 08/16/17 01:51 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Ann Hebistand Offline
Active
Ann Hebistand  Offline
Active

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
My contribution this week is less a review than an analysis of how DC Comics writing was evolving over the course of the 80s.

See, even though I did not enjoy this issue as much as I did the last time I re-read it a few years ago, the re-read of this issue did clarify exactly why I enjoy the Baxter Era so much more than the previous thirty or so issues of Levitz Mark-2.

The density of Levitz's writing style, with all its subplots, world-building, and character moments, was not well-accommodated by the standard 25-page done-in-one/make-each-issue-stand-alone format of DC Comics up to that time. This script, in particular, is so dense that, even with almost twice as many pages as a monthly issue, Giffen and Patterson both seem a bit overwhelmed to me. Once again, Giffen riffs on the Perez style, but more awkwardly than in 288, what with little panels upon little panels piling up on top of each other, while Patterson appears to be sensing the approaching deadline like a mad dog giving chase, his inks lacking the finesse he had demonstrated on 286-289.

But I also have some issues with Levitz's script. To reiterate something I said in my review of 287, I think he was at his best when he stuck to no-nonsense, straight-shooting thrills, instead of throwing everything (and every cast member) but the kitchen sink -- whether the plot could bear the weight or not. It's like an episode of a 60s or 70s sci-fi TV show written and directed by an overambitious film-school graduate.

In short, issues like this one are the reason why "decompressed writing," or stretching a story out across anywhere from 4 to 6 or even more issues, *had to happen.* LSH Annual 1, for all its positive aspects which Cramey already pointed out, is, in my opinion, so "compressed" that it ends up imploding.

To try to end this post on a positive note, at least it bodes well for the next storyline, the Great Darkness Saga, with its 5-issues-plus framework seemingly offering Levitz and Giffen the room to stretch out that they needed.

#936059 - 08/16/17 04:36 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
thoth lad Offline
Tempus Fugitive
thoth lad  Offline
Tempus Fugitive

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
Touring Bgtzl and Bgztl with M...
LoSH Annual 1

An excellent Giffen/Giordano cover graces the annual. Previous issues have shown how to focus the reader’s attention. Here, six Legionnaires form a circle in the air around a central figure. Its evil expression is surely linked to the cables that each hero fights with, and which connect them all. Note how the pose of each hero turns, from the front of Vi through to the back of Shady and round again. The use of Vi at the top also helps to keep the logo clear and uncluttered, but still adds to the overall design. Good stuff indeed.

The opening page shows Shvaughn Erin approach the Legion HQ. She introduces herself, and her role in her thought bubble, courtesy of another little data drop in with the normal dialogue. But there’s more going on than that. There’s a certain ease to this page that will work its way through the annual and beyond into the Giffen/Levitz run. The comfort of a team that has already gelled, helped in having an expanded format to work within. It shows itself in the roll call. It doesn’t just give the names. Giffen has drawn all of the Legion symbols behind. The captioning is whimsical, even as it tells us of the perils that await.

Look at Weisinger Plaza! Split levels, with a variety of cosmopolitan alien races strolling the concourses!. Is it a complex like the one shown in the adult Legion stories? That’s something the creative team will address in a later issue. The art gives us little tech modules, Interlac on the levels and on Erin’s cute booties. She’s also walking on an anti gravity platform too, just to give it all a 30th century vibe.

Erin is to be the Legion’s first Science Police liaison officer. It’s the sort of thing you’d expect from the Avengers. But Shvaughn is no Gyrich. She’s been keen to work with the team since Earth War. That was back in the Levitz v1.0 days, and Levitz had plans for her.

Speaking of the Avengers, there’s a security mishap that reminds me very much of the doorstep security of the Avengers mansion. Shvaughn is freed from metallic tentacles, eerily reminding the reader of that cover, by a departing Dawnstar and Wildfire.

Levitz has a knack of capturing the characters in a short amount of time. Last issue, we had the directness of Nura accompanying the stoic practicality of Lar. Here, it’s the reactions of Drake and Dawny. Both are bronze age additions, and are more visually distinctive than their Adventure era counterparts. I think this adds nicely to Shvaughn’s reaction.

Drake is direct and quick to rise to Dawny’s gentle rebuke. Ironically, he almost gives away the upcoming plot by summing up the results of Brainy’s experiments. A sort of more argumentative version of Brin’s instinctive intuition. smile As grouchy as he is, he stops the problem before it escalates.

Dawny is colder, with her single word interaction with the new liaison officer. But she clearly cares enough for Erin’s well being to chide Wildfire for his approach.

As with having a liaison officer, we also have two Legionnaires going on leave. That’s not new, but adds to the organisational feel for this scene. These are professional heroes. Having some of them on leave adds something a little different to “on a mission in a different galaxy” when trouble calls. Not that Drake and Dawny are going to get too far.

So, in a few panels we get to see more than one layer of two Legionnaires. Levitz then starts to show us more of Jan Arrah. He’s someone who has been often defined by his tragedy, rhater than having a character of his own. There’s an awkward moment between them, but it quickly passes as they tour the building together. Had Lightning Lad not quit, what would have happened between them?

(The answer is that Jan would have gone full sociopath while Erin stalked him across the galaxy, and not in a law enforcement way. In case anyone’s wondering smile )

Jan is little more than a tour guide here, but it’s a start. We see all the gizmos Giffen wants introduced through his saner fictional proxy, Brainy smile We’ve had the mission monitor board, but we get a run through some Alien movie portals and Forbin Project movie security terminals. Remember: Invest in holographics. They’re going to be huge! (Remember as we go that Alien had a lot of technology going wrong, and the Forbin Project had a similar theme.)

I mentioned hints of a wider organisational structure and responsibilities above. This extends to the next part of the tour. The pair look down onto the Legion’s new medical centre. Although Brainy gets a lot of ability hogging here, it’s not a one man show. We’re reminded of Nura’s Naltorian science. She did alter Ayla’s powers after all, and we saw the technology in a recent back up too. Silver Age tampering becomes Bronze Age genetic modification. The superior biological knowledge of Daxam goes back at least as far as the team trying to find a way to bring Lightning Lad back.

“But you never heard of us except as fighters, right, Jacques?” says Lar. This page does a great deal to establish the Legion as something greater than your normal super hero group. The “Jacques” referred to by Lar is Jacques Foccart. He’s the brother of the unconscious Danielle, whom Lar, Nura and Querl are trying to cure. More points for Lar’s selfless credit giving, while Nura likes to share.

Like the Nullport back story leading into the Khund mission, it turns out that the Tenzil back story leads into this annual. Querl is using techniques he’s trying out on Tenzil with Danielle. She’s “suffering from a rare energy-overload on her nervous system.” Considering that both Foccarts would eventually become Legionnaires (I am *not* putting spoiler in!), this is quite a page.

Around the medical centre are floating red globes. They are part of Brainy’s computer controlled solution to Danielle’s problems. He’s sure that *this* time he will be able to control things, and prevent harm. Uh oh. Whatever it is Querl thinks he’s controlling takes no time at all to break any constraints as soon as it’s activated. Nura is electrocuted at her terminal while Brainy just protects himself. The dialogue tells us that he’s activated his flight ring in time, but it really should have read “force field”

It a different sort of Giffen nine panel page, as a single bottom panel shows Danielle sitting upright, with completely red eyes.

It could have been a much larger tour, much like the Adult Legion story, through the eyes of a familiar newcomer. But there was another reason why Shvaughn was seen walking up to the HQ at the start. This is the Legion in the Exorcist.

Cosmic Boy is the first to feel the effects. He’s trapped by metal in his own room. Like all the best Legion artists, Giffen seamlessly recreates the Legion’s world. We saw Imra get a (to my mind much improved) new uniform in the Khundian mission. Here it’s Rokk getting a much-needed upgrade. The scene loses lots of points when we learn that Ayla pined away after Brin by sewing!

It’s been mentioned that Levitz’s subplots simmer away, before coming to the boil across a number of issues. Well simmering was what we saw way back in #284 when we saw the inside of Imra and Garth’s Legion HQ apartment. Having established they lived in the HQ then, it’s familiar to see them there, when it’s next to be trashed the kitchen’s out of control Atomiser. One was cooking in each scene in #284 Imra even comments that she uses the atomiser much more than Garth. How’s that for build up?
The atomiser has a shape familiar to all old school Legion readers (of which I wasn’t one at the time, so missed it)

With whatever is controlling Danielle starting to attack, it seals off the Legion HQ form the outside world. It’s another thruway line, but it’s mentioned that the Legion would normally need Earthgov approval before doing this. It all adds to the team being part of a larger UP.

This is built upon in stages through the story. Gim’s mom, and Earth President coordinates a response to the situation. She’s strong enough a leader to tell the Green Lantern Corps to stand down (and pat the seed for a later issue on why the GLC aren’t allowed on Earth). The SP look to find a way into the Legion’s HQ, providing the reader with a great double page HQ schematic.

Back inside, Thom and Dirk are attacked by their holographic (they’ll be huge I tell you!) D&D characters. Star Boy is now sporting a distinctive beard. Having the holograms stop and peer out at the “real” world is very creepy.

Danielle seems satisfied with her work. Controlling her is Computo, Brainiac’s creation that wanted to destroy humanity, after it had taken all the knowledge from their minds (back in Adventure #240 – Look It Up Lad)

Here’s where the story makes a few Plot Driven missteps. Jan Arrah is watching all of this. But he can’t get to them because a convenient barrier springs up around the medical centre. It’s material, but reactive to his powers. It’s for scenes like this that Jan is so frequently underused.

Lar is down there, but conveniently has been bathed in red solar radiation *and* had his anti-lead serum tampered with. The latter will kill him, rather than neutralise him and I still don’t see why he can’t move.

Elsewhere, word has got out and evacuations are taking place. Very wise. But reservist Luornu Durgo can’t face going back to confront Computo. It’s a poignant moment, where we learn the extent of the trauma losing a body caused her. It’s certainly a lot more than we got at the time. As Chuck and Lu had both left the team, I wonder if this seen was added in for the nod to the original story. Lu certainly doesn’t get any closure from this reappearance of Computo. I can easily see a finale where she uses an old Adventure era tunnel into the Legion’s basement and her powers to defeat Computo. But the finale will go to someone else in this Annual. Not that she would have got past the shields. The Subs couldn’t and they are dismissed by the SP (and mentioned the same panel as the Super pets). That line between underdog and comedy value is a thin one.

There are others in the HQ and all are subjected to Computo’s wrath, as the life support is switched off. While I was happy being absorbed by the story when reading it, I do wonder what Computo’s long term goals are here. Before, it was everything. Here, like a lot of second time villains, it’s personal and vengeful.

Gim and Vi have the Legion cruiser they are on fly out the building towards Earth’s shiny polymer sphere. This pushes forward that subplot, as Vi is sorting out her feelings and we learn that the rescue cruiser on the Khundian mission was the president’s personal cruiser.

Brin and Blok are attacked by gymnasium equipment. The two would become regular companions under Levitz, starting around here. Blok seems to get to be the butt of Brin’s comments. Fortunately for Timberwolf, Blok’s alien curiosity seems to have replaced his darker assassin past.

Tinya, Jo and Ayla are taken down by domestic appliances and an explosion. It’s probably not something they’ll want to recount later on. But it was unexpected. We get the standard explanation of Jo having to switch powers. Giffen shows him lifting storage crates back into his quarters (this, and the Reflecto statue earlier are throw away references to that story. On both occasions no one wants to go into any detail smile ) using super strength. Ayla is lifting even more than Jo, thanks to an effect of her powers we don’t see enough of. She effectively has super strength too.

... more to come


"...not having to believe in a thing to be interested in it and not having to explain a thing to appreciate the wonder of it."
#936060 - 08/16/17 04:37 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
thoth lad Offline
Tempus Fugitive
thoth lad  Offline
Tempus Fugitive

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
Touring Bgtzl and Bgztl with M...
...continued


At the halfway point, the Legionnaires in the building are all going through domestic versions of death traps characters would have faced back in the Silver Age,

It’s becoming clear that Danielle body is burning up, with Computo controlling it. Will Brainy be able to save her and stop the villain?

Find out…after this interlude with Chameleon Boy. The UP is a lot nearer war with the Khunds thanks to his mission. He’s been pretty much named as the cause of it in public too. Aware of having to face the consequences, a slump shouldered Cham goes off further into central park, oblivious to the cruiser streaking overhead, en route to the Legion HQ. Another chance of redemption gone.

Brainiac Five has a plan. It involves getting Jacques to take a vial of Lyle Norg’s invisibility serum. There’s a risk involved. It might kill him. But if he doesn’t try, Computo looks likely to kill his sister. It would seem that telepathic earplugs only require skin contact to work. They don’t have to be anywhere near the brain, so Querl gives Jacques the information just by palming him a spare one. Once it’s finished with Danielle, Computo may go into the main computer. That would presumably get the villain back into it’s all conquering goals again.

Jacques makes his brave decision and manages to get to the serum, not without tension and an access code mishap (we learn that the Foccart’s mom has died along the way).

While all this was going on, the rest of the Legion would battle Computo’s traps.
Lightning Lad would free himself and Imra. Together they’d retrieve an unconscious Cosmic Boy and rescue Star Boy and Sun Boy from a D&D crucifixion. Again, the holos are very creepy. I do wonder why Star Boy couldn’t have used his powers to wreck the equipment as Lightning Lad did. The group run into further trouble with only Lightning Lad left to do battle with a distorted version of himself.

Computo is not above attacking the Legion psychologically. It makes the villain work on another level. It knows that Garth has suffered form depression. It knows of Lar’s fears of the Phantom Zone and it uses Danielle’s fate against both Brainy and Jacques.

Garth seemed a lot stronger this issue. He comments that blasting the atomiser was the first piece of luck he’d had for ages. That’s an early seed for a much later Luck Lords story.

Other groups don’t fare so well. Brin and Blok never leave the gym, despite their powers. Brin refers to possibly not being Lightning Lad’s favourite person after the Khundian mission. It indicates the strained feelings within the team and puts Imra’s reunion dinner with Garth in a new light.

We see Ayla, who has saved her colleagues also think on Brin & Imra’s embrace as she lies in the rubble of the HQ. She wishes Brin was with her in what she thinks could be her last moments alive.

Element Lad, Shadow Lass and Shvaughn don’t make any real progress. They move through the HQ, blocked by Computo’s Plot powers.

Colossal Boy and Violet have to be saved by Wildfire and Dawnstar. Dawny’s comment at being surprised that Gim couldn’t control the ship, is one of those comments that seems sensible, but comes with a sting. It’s careless of Gim not to get a replacement flight ring. He’s been around long enough to know that anything could happen in a Legionnaire’s life.

I mentioned the comfort of a well working creative team at the beginning being partly due to the increased space in an Annual. Having Computo traps groups of Legionnaire compartmentalises the characters. It allows him to create a story full of action and suspense. But also with the ability to bring in or drop characters as the space/ storytelling dictates. A number of the battles are essentially peripheral to the main action. I think the build up with Jan, Shady and Shvaughn suffers from this a little. They don’t even get a battle.

Foccart’s disappearance gets an immediate reaction from Computo. It correctly surmises Brainy’s involvement and attacks. Brainy just manages to get an instruction to Lar before he’s knocked unconscious. Lar uses heat vision, under the strain of his paralysis, to give Jacques access to a tranquiliser disc. Jacques isn’t a traditional hero. He’s feels fear and he questions his actions. Bravery and a sense of sacrifice he has naturally, and he ends Computo’s threat by subduing his sister.

In the aftermath, Brainy tenders his resignation. He cites this as one of a number of failures. Despite not being leader, and completely in keeping with the direct approach seen at the start of the annual, Wildfire sticks up for him. Drake would also prefer to have either Lamprey or Nightwind in the team, when Brainy nominates Jacques as his successor. Having also joined in battle, adds his vote for Jacques. He’d mention this again later in the Baxter run too.

Outside, Shvaughn leaves the HQ wondering about the excitement that lies ahead. There’s no reason why this couldn’t have been the last page, as it would have framed the story more smoothly.

In the end, Brainy stays with the team and Jacques also joins. It’s a touching scene as Jacques’ main concern is his sister. He’s a bit tearful throughout his first appearance, almost as much as Superman does in DC Events.

One of the reasons that the Annual works so well, is that it’s not a standalone tale. It’s not just the new member, or the cosmetic (Coz-metic in one instance smile ) changes. All the recent sublots are involved here. Even if there’s not any huge leaps forward with them, they all get space to build up some tension. The Brin/Ayla/Imra/Garth rectangle is there, along with the Vi/Gim storyline. Nura continues getting built up by Levitz. Computo shows Lar a possible fear. Is this what helps send him over the edge later on? It’s certainly something that the team will come back to.

One other subplot that gets panel time, but not a lot of movement is the Servants of Darkness one. In single panels throughout the annual we get :-

Computo awakes
In 1969, Superboy feels a sudden chill returning to Earth
Our villain senses a power from Earth and dispatches a mockery to claim it.
The mockery approaches Earth and pauses to assess the new polymer screen
The mockery finds the edge of the screen, but it’s hit by something.
The mockery is apparently crushed, and our villain says that he will have to create another in his place.

As the Great Darkness approaches, I’m reminded of a thread from just after I joined here.. Who is this mockery? He doesn’t seem to fit with the ones created for the regular issues, and why would all this affect Superboy 1000 years in the past?

I have just noticed that bit of random metal that hits him is the runaway Legion cruiser that Vi and Gim were trapped on. The Legion were beating the villain even before the Great Darkness saga began! smile


"...not having to believe in a thing to be interested in it and not having to explain a thing to appreciate the wonder of it."
#936061 - 08/16/17 05:21 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
thoth lad Offline
Tempus Fugitive
thoth lad  Offline
Tempus Fugitive

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
Touring Bgtzl and Bgztl with M...
Originally Posted by Cramer
Comments: This is an exciting, fast-paced, satisfying story


nod The pacing is solid. Computo escalates from possessing one body to controlling the HQ, to threatening the world. The possession of Danielle has a growing adverse affect on her and as you say...

Originally Posted by Cramer
There’s a real sense of danger as the Science Police and Earthgov deal with the emergency.



Originally Posted by Cramer
Danielle looks truly possessed, with glowing eyes and drenched in sweat as her small physical body tries to cope with Computo .


Jacques: The Power of the Comics Code compels you! smile

Originally Posted by Cramer
Newcomer Jacques is credible as her frantic brother, out of his depth, but willing to risk his own life to help his sister .


I think that sums up a lot of Jacques time, and place, on the team. He's more of a heroic everyman than someone with a heroic past or obvious skill/powers set.

Originally Posted by Cramer
...and an untold, promised-for-the-future story of why Green Lanterns aren’t allowed on Earth.


Or is it just on Mondays as they were about to rule on in v4?

I don't like Monday's
I'm gonna shoot the whole Earth down - as the Boom-Tube Rats would sing about the incident.

Originally Posted by Cramer
There is a bit of an odd moment when Shadow Lass says that she never heard of Computo; something that important to Legion history would surely have been common knowledge of all members.


Unfortunately, someone put the Legion Archive in a vault in the Legion's basement. Shady went to open it and... Mordru!

Originally Posted by Cramer
An unusually humble Brainy takes full responsibility for the mess. A very forgiving Element Lad takes the unilateral decision to reject his resignation .


As in his later trial, Brainy will have calculated the odds of his dismissal. The selfless "let Jacques join in my place" thing was just to adjust it in his favour. smile


Originally Posted by Cramer
It’s a happy ending, with a promise of future threats: supposedly unconscious Danielle’s eyes open and glow red


there's a much more subtle inference that Computo is still in there, a few issues from now. I found the red eyes to be a little much, after a supposed victory. As Danielle is being monitored by devices, there's nothing at all to stop a fully controlled Danielle from reaching out immediately.



"...not having to believe in a thing to be interested in it and not having to explain a thing to appreciate the wonder of it."
#936220 - 08/19/17 05:36 AM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,905
Harbinger Offline
Harbinger  Offline


Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,905
here, more often than not
This is one of my favourite single issues.

The art is, for the most part, great as it's clean and consistent throughout. Introducing Computo to a more modern audience without it looking like a kids toy from the 50's is a good idea as the concept of a rogue uber- powerful amoral AI is a natural fit into Legion mythos.

A couple of points irk though: the convenient force field that blocks Jan and Shady, Mon El being so easily neutralised, and Brainy's force field falling to random debris are all plot devices that kind of fail, but none are deal breakers.

The introduction of Jacques was well done. He's not the usual confident hero and about time someone thought it would be fun to have a French Legionnaire. Well, I always find it funny.

It's amazing that he's only the second black Legionnaire, thankfully later incarnations of the team try to redress this imbalance.

I love how everyone gets some screen time and in the end no-one dies this time. Great characterisation for Lu too.

Last edited by Harbinger; 08/19/17 05:59 AM.

Legion Worlds Four - awesome ongoing adventures set in the Retro-Boot, only in the Bits o' Legionnaire Business Forum.
#936231 - 08/19/17 12:03 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: thoth lad]  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 15,346
Fat Cramer Offline
Fat Cramer  Offline


Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 15,346
Café Cramer
Originally Posted by thoth lad


An excellent Giffen/Giordano cover graces the annual. Previous issues have shown how to focus the reader’s attention. Here, six Legionnaires form a circle in the air around a central figure. Its evil expression is surely linked to the cables that each hero fights with, and which connect them all. Note how the pose of each hero turns, from the front of Vi through to the back of Shady and round again. The use of Vi at the top also helps to keep the logo clear and uncluttered, but still adds to the overall design. Good stuff indeed.


*sigh* I never notice these details. Thanks for pointing them out!

Quote
As with having a liaison officer, we also have two Legionnaires going on leave. That’s not new, but adds to the organisational feel for this scene. These are professional heroes. Having some of them on leave adds something a little different to “on a mission in a different galaxy” when trouble calls. Not that Drake and Dawny are going to get too far.


Good point; it also makes them seem like real people, not always on duty.

Quote
So, in a few panels we get to see more than one layer of two Legionnaires. Levitz then starts to show us more of Jan Arrah. He’s someone who has been often defined by his tragedy, rhater than having a character of his own. There’s an awkward moment between them, but it quickly passes as they tour the building together. Had Lightning Lad not quit, what would have happened between them?

(The answer is that Jan would have gone full sociopath while Erin stalked him across the galaxy, and not in a law enforcement way. In case anyone’s wondering smile )


An untold story from the Vertigo Legion. I like this possibility!

Quote
Like the Nullport back story leading into the Khund mission, it turns out that the Tenzil back story leads into this annual. Querl is using techniques he’s trying out on Tenzil with Danielle. She’s “suffering from a rare energy-overload on her nervous system.” Considering that both Foccarts would eventually become Legionnaires (I am *not* putting spoiler in!), this is quite a page.


Geez, imagine if Tenzil had become Computo. He would have eaten everything like Pac-Man.

Quote
Here’s where the story makes a few Plot Driven missteps. Jan Arrah is watching all of this. But he can’t get to them because a convenient barrier springs up around the medical centre. It’s material, but reactive to his powers. It’s for scenes like this that Jan is so frequently underused.

Lar is down there, but conveniently has been bathed in red solar radiation *and* had his anti-lead serum tampered with. The latter will kill him, rather than neutralise him and I still don’t see why he can’t move.


Venge/Computo will use the same technique on Lar in the DnA series, so I guess Computo's memory spans versions.

You and Harbinger bring up Jan's ineffectiveness. It is strange/disappointing, although it provides the reader with some suspense that perhaps he, Shady and Shvaughn will be the ones to finally defeat Computo. It's interesting that the Legionnaires who didn't face off against Computo the first time (except for Jan) are unaffected: Dawnstar, Wildfire, Shady, Shvaughn. Mopey Cham doesn't even know what's happening.

Quote
But reservist Luornu Durgo can’t face going back to confront Computo. It’s a poignant moment, where we learn the extent of the trauma losing a body caused her. It’s certainly a lot more than we got at the time. As Chuck and Lu had both left the team, I wonder if this seen was added in for the nod to the original story. Lu certainly doesn’t get any closure from this reappearance of Computo. I can easily see a finale where she uses an old Adventure era tunnel into the Legion’s basement and her powers to defeat Computo. But the finale will go to someone else in this Annual.


That would have been a seriously great story, if Lu could face off against Computo and win.

Quote
There are others in the HQ and all are subjected to Computo’s wrath, as the life support is switched off. While I was happy being absorbed by the story when reading it, I do wonder what Computo’s long term goals are here. Before, it was everything. Here, like a lot of second time villains, it’s personal and vengeful.


Possibly his motives were being affected when channeled through a young child, even the sweetest of whom can have "I hate you" temper tantrums.

Quote
Ayla is lifting even more than Jo, thanks to an effect of her powers we don’t see enough of. She effectively has super strength too.


Good point - and not used enough in the stories.

Quote
Computo is not above attacking the Legion psychologically. It makes the villain work on another level. It knows that Garth has suffered form depression. It knows of Lar’s fears of the Phantom Zone and it uses Danielle’s fate against both Brainy and Jacques.


Smarter with every reincarnation.

Quote
Element Lad, Shadow Lass and Shvaughn don’t make any real progress. They move through the HQ, blocked by Computo’s Plot powers.


Hah! Clearly the most devastating power of all!

Quote
Outside, Shvaughn leaves the HQ wondering about the excitement that lies ahead. There’s no reason why this couldn’t have been the last page, as it would have framed the story more smoothly.


True, and it would have been easily accomplished by rearranging a couple of panels.

Quote
As the Great Darkness approaches, I’m reminded of a thread from just after I joined here.. Who is this mockery? He doesn’t seem to fit with the ones created for the regular issues, and why would all this affect Superboy 1000 years in the past?

I have just noticed that bit of random metal that hits him is the runaway Legion cruiser that Vi and Gim were trapped on. The Legion were beating the villain even before the Great Darkness saga began! smile


Missed that myself, nice bit of coincidence.


Holy Cats of Egypt!
#936244 - 08/19/17 04:41 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Fat Cramer]  
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
thoth lad Offline
Tempus Fugitive
thoth lad  Offline
Tempus Fugitive

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
Touring Bgtzl and Bgztl with M...
Originally Posted by Fat Cramer
Good point; it also makes them seem like real people, not always on duty.


Clocking on and off after a period of duty is probably another cop show analogy. We’ve seen leave before, but it seems a bit more like the end of a shift with it being Drake and Dawny.

Originally Posted by Fat Cramer
Geez, imagine if Tenzil had become Computo. He would have eaten everything like Pac-Man.


Computo: I hunger for power!... and you don’t want to make me hunger!
Later…
Computo: Dox was foolish to leave this power pellet in the lab. Now I’m invincible! But first I must chase after Phantom Girl for a while!


Originally Posted by Fat Cramer
Venge/Computo will use the same technique on Lar in the DnA series, so I guess Computo's memory spans versions.


That’s a scary thought! Computo could join the Psycho Pirate’s Crisis survivors Support Group though.

Originally Posted by Fat Cramer
You and Harbinger bring up Jan's ineffectiveness. It is strange/disappointing, although it provides the reader with some suspense that perhaps he, Shady and Shvaughn will be the ones to finally defeat Computo.

There’s a point where they go through the floor, and I thought that this would have some bearing on the story. But it just led to the basement, and they get no closer to the enemy. Shady says that without his serum, Lar will die as soon as “Computo lifts that paralysis.” But why Lar wouldn’t die just as quickly under the ray eludes me. It’s not as though it’s suspending his functions. He can still use heat visions and is aware enough to appreciate the phantom zone images and to communicate with Brainy.


Originally Posted by Fat Cramer
It's interesting that the Legionnaires who didn't face off against Computo the first time (except for Jan) are unaffected: Dawnstar, Wildfire, Shady, Shvaughn. Mopey Cham doesn't even know what's happening.


Computo: Ha! The Legion will never discover my Super Robot Construction Base from where I shall conquer the United Planets!
Dawnstar: I have found Computo’s secret base.
Wildfire: Right. Let’s end this.
>One giant Anti-Matter Blast later<
Dawnstar: At least our vacation was only slightly delayed…


Originally Posted by Fat Cramer
Smarter with every reincarnation.

Brainy: Well done Jacques! That tranq-disc put an end to Computo’s control over your sister.
>Computo sticks one thumb up as Danielle slips into unconsciousness<
Computo: I’ll…be…back.
Brainy: I didn’t know your sister was Austrian.
Jacques: Je ne comprends rien.


"...not having to believe in a thing to be interested in it and not having to explain a thing to appreciate the wonder of it."
#936290 - 08/20/17 09:44 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 23,449
He Who Wanders Offline
She ran and called him Wildfire.
He Who Wanders  Offline
She ran and called him Wildfire.

Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 23,449
The Plateaus of Ecstasy
RL has given me precious little time to do a full review, but I wanted to comment on a few things.

Originally Posted by FC
This is an exciting, fast-paced, satisfying story with everyone but the Super-cousins (yay! - except for one panel showing Superboy in 1969, sensing “a sudden chill”). We get some glimpse into the personal lives and thoughts of each Legionnaire before disaster strikes them, which provides continuity with the events of previous issues.


Originally Posted by Annfie
The density of Levitz's writing style, with all its subplots, world-building, and character moments, was not well-accommodated by the standard 25-page done-in-one/make-each-issue-stand-alone format of DC Comics up to that time. This script, in particular, is so dense that, even with almost twice as many pages as a monthly issue, Giffen and Patterson both seem a bit overwhelmed to me.


Here we have the yin and yang of Levitz Mk II in general and this issue in particular. This is indeed a fast-paced and satisfying story, but it is also dense and overwhelming, not only for the artists, I'm sure, but also for me as a reader.

To mark the occasion of the Legion's first annual, Levitz threw in everything he apparently could think of. At the very least, he includes every active Legionnaire. This accomplishment alone would exhaust most readers. But, for good measure, he installs a new supporting character, brings back an old villain, introduces a new Legionnaire, advances his Great Darkness subplot, and makes occasional (but not distracting) references to long ago and recent stories. These accomplishments would be enough to satisfy most fanboys. Giffen and Patterson also rise to the challenge by redesigning Legion HQ so it looks more futuristic, include numerous graphics such as the mission monitor board symbols (some of which we may have seen in previous issues) and update the appearance of two Legionnaires, Star Boy and Cosmic Boy. All in all, it's a massive undertaking.

It's also a very successful one. This is because the spine of the story is simple: While trying to help a young girl, Brainy unleashes an old enemy which takes over the HQ, trapping the Legionnaires inside and posing a threat to earth. The defeat of the villain rests on the girl’s brother, who must make a soul-wrenching decision to possibly end her life while risking his own. Jacques Foccart is the heart and soul of this story.

Jacques serves multiple functions. He is the newbie through whom new readers come to know the Legion. (Shvaughn also serves this purpose when she is shown around the redesigned headquarters.) He makes us care about him because he cares about his sister. And, defying comic book stereotypes, he is not an angry young black man. He never blames Brainy for what has happened to his sister; he makes it clear to us that he knows Brainy is her only hope, and the surgery’s success was never guaranteed. He performs heroically while making us all too aware of his fears and uncertainty. The true achievement of this issue, in my opinion, is that Levitz introduced such a well-developed character in the confines of a very crowded issue.

The other Legionnaires serve to advance the plot, though some get more panel time than others. I do not quibble with Levitz’s choices; in fact, I think he made logical and sometimes surprising decisions. Brainy, of course, is center stage with Jacques, and he continues to show his calm-in-the-face-of-disaster side while remaining caring and compassionate toward Danielle. He brilliantly outwits Computo by palming his telepathic earplug into Jacques’ hand (we presume; he couldn’t place it in his ear), and he offers his own resignation to take responsibility for Computo’s revival.

Garth, Imra, Gim, “Vi”, Jan, Brin, and Blok also get good panel time with scenes that somewhat advance their characters. Others have less to do. Dirk and Thom play a holo-game and are beaten up by it. Dawny and Drake are conveniently absent from HQ but turn back in time to rescue Gim and “Vi”. Shady is just there for Jan and Shvaughn to talk to. But not every character needs to shine, and, as I mentioned in a previous review, it’s good if some merely serve as supporting characters from time to time.

Because the story is so densely packed, there is a danger of it becoming hard to follow. Levitz solves this problem with a simple but elegant solution. Beginning on Page 12 and continuing for a dozen more, the final panel on most pages provides a brief interlude to something else going on away from the main action on the page. On Page 12, Superboy feels a sudden chill. On Page 14, the Subs are turned away by the Science Police. On Page 16, a sci police cruiser flags down Dawny and Wildfire. And so forth. This simple device provides a needed break from the action and a transition into the next scene. It is used most effectively on pp. 18-22 and 24 to advance the Great Darkness subplot. In this way, a lot is accomplished without our attention being diverted from the main story.

While I wouldn’t care to read a densely packed issue like this every month, I appreciate this one for what it is: a momentous occasion that celebrates the Legion’s renewed popularity and creative resurgence. It gives all members of the creative team a chance to strut their stuff, and, boy, do they deliver!


Check out my new Power Club website!

The Semi-Great Gildersleeve - writing, super-heroes, and this 'n' that
#936311 - 08/21/17 07:15 AM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Ann Hebistand Offline
Active
Ann Hebistand  Offline
Active

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Originally Posted by He Who Wanders
While I wouldn’t care to read a densely packed issue like this every month, I appreciate this one for what it is: a momentous occasion that celebrates the Legion’s renewed popularity and creative resurgence.


I think that's the perfect way to put it in a nutshell. Thanks, He Who. Thanks, too, for making time to keep your toes in the Re-Reads despite Real Life throwing obstacles at you.

Good point also about Jacques rising above the black stereotypes of that particular era. That honestly had never occurred to me before, I was so distracted by his c'est frommage Claremont-style accent. Whether or not Levitz was consciously doing a cynical imitation of Claremont, I have to say that your observations, combined with Harbinger's consistently wonderful portrayal of Jacques in her Legion Worlds series of fan fictions, have just about brought me around a full 180 degrees in regards to this character.

#936345 - 08/21/17 07:25 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 23,449
He Who Wanders Offline
She ran and called him Wildfire.
He Who Wanders  Offline
She ran and called him Wildfire.

Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 23,449
The Plateaus of Ecstasy
I'm glad you're warming up to Jacques, Annfie. He truly was a groundbreaking character for a number of reasons.

When I was in my final year of college, 1992-93, I drafted an article on the use of accents and dialect in comics. I intended to send it to the Comics Buyers Guide but never did. However, I learned so much in my English and German courses that I wanted to apply it to comic book characters such as Nightcrawler to show how writers used accents in dialogue. In most cases, the writers simply throw in a few foreign words to establish the character's foreign-ness, and it often comes across as a bad stereotype. In becoming acquainted with many people of international origin since then, I've come to realize the best approach when writing dialogue is to focus on what they say--word choice, emphasis, and expressions--instead of trying to recreate a foreign accent. To a degree, Jacques falls into the stereotype camp. However, this isn't necessarily bad since it immediately establishes his unique speech patterns. As I wrote above, the character transcends stereotypes in so many ways that it was worth putting up with a few French-isms.

Besides, if handled correctly, the use of foreign words can be educational to young readers! I learned a few German words from Nightcrawler, and the love of the language I developed from him led me to minor in German. In LSH Annual # 1, Jacques uses the word "maman"; I had no idea what it meant, and Levitz (to his credit) doesn't explain it or include a footnote. Now, of course, I know it means "mom." Jacques is praying to his deceased mother. Discovering things like this is what makes education--and comics--so much fun.


Check out my new Power Club website!

The Semi-Great Gildersleeve - writing, super-heroes, and this 'n' that
#936357 - 08/22/17 07:18 AM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 15,346
Fat Cramer Offline
Fat Cramer  Offline


Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 15,346
Café Cramer
LSH #290 And the Servant Shall be a Sign by Paul Levitz, art by Keith Giffen & Larry Mahlstedt, colours by Carl Gafford, letters by John Costanza

[Linked Image]

A team of Legionnaires, including new member Invisible Kid, investigates some destruction at the Museum of Mystic Arts. Suddenly, a dark figure breaks through a wall and commands them to serve the darkness, or else. This servant of darkness seeks a magical wand held by the Director, Steffanaci. He easily fells the Legionnaires as they attack; the wand is dropped and the servant leaves with it.

At Legion HQ, Brainy explains tourism to Blok. Brin gripes at Chameleon Boy for all the trouble he caused, leaves in a huff and has an embarrasing moment as he collides with Saturn Girl.

The Museum team has gone to London, since Stefanacci thought that Excalibur might be the next mystical object to be stolen. They encounter more tourists at the Tower of London. Another creature of darkness attacks and tries to steal the sword, both Wildfire and Invisible Kid try to stop him, without success. Wildfire does land a successful punch, but the servant recovers and flies off through a space warp with Excalibur.

At Legion HQ, Garth is in a bad state; Gym’ll diagnoses an electrical dysfunction of the brain and counsels waiting and hoping. Ayla remains with him as Jan goes to find Imra. He finds her speaking with Brin about the asteroid incident, tells her that Garth needs her and makes a few snide remarks. We learn that there is an election for Legion Leader the next day.

On the remote barren planetoid, the dark being congratulates his servants, while calling them mockeries. He feeds on the mystical objects they have brought.

The team at the Tower of London discuss what is going on; they decide to return to HQ for help. Jacques volunteers to try and follow a servant if they encounter one again. They next head to Talok VIII with Shadow Lass, since Brainy believes that the Orb of Orthanak will be the next target. The lights go out; even Shady has trouble seeing in this darkness but perceives a female shape seizing the Orb. The Legionnaires fight back, but another servant appears, seizes the Orb and leaves. Jacques deflects the female servant from entering the portal and she becomes a prisoner of the Legion.

At Legion HQ, a few members meet regarding the election. Element Lad declares himself a candidate, followed by Dream Girl and Ultra Boy. The team from Talok VIII arrives with the captured servant, expressing their fears over the power of the servants’ master. Marte Allon contacts the group to inform them that Chameleon Boy’s treason trial will be held the next day.

As Superboy carries the servant to the lab, Shady follows, disturbed with the effect the servant has on her. Superboy confides that he felt the same unease with the first servant. As they enter the lab, they see Danielle Foccart/Computo and observe instruments indicating that the presence of the servant is invoking nightmares in her.

The dark being receives the Orb and gains still more power, deriding the servant, his son, who brought the Orb. He proclaims that it is time to take power from the living and dominate the universe with his darkness. The image of the son and the emerging figure make it pretty clear that the servant is Orion and the dark being, Darkseid.

Comments:

And so begins one of the great Legion stories. We’ve had inklings of the menace in previous issues and they burst full-blown into action here. The reader is led on a chase, along with the Legion, as mystical objects are stolen, leading one to suspect that a magical foe might be at the heart of this mystery – until the final pages. What impresses, up to that point, is just how powerful the servants are; if the master calls them mockeries, the master must be very fearsome indeed. I think we’re further misled by the silhouette of the master, quite lean, with a very large collar; it just doesn’t look like Darkseid.

Orion is quite recognizable to anyone familiar with the New Gods but the other servants are harder to identify. Clues are given at the end that the Legion might be facing some form of Kryptonian or Talokian, given the comments by Superboy and Shadow Lass.

(BTW, where did Superboy come from (so to speak)? Is Levitz doing a test run to gauge how much readers want the Boy of Steel back in the Legion on a regular basis?)

There’s a nice nod to the early Legion with the explanation of how Excalibur was found by Supergirl, which apparently still hadn’t been verified as the true Excalibur at the time it was stolen.

Apart from the mystery of the servants’ mystical crime spree, life goes on for the Legion as they prepare for an election. Dream Girl’s candidacy surprises other members although we’ve seen how competent she is in the last few issues. Perhaps her teammates aren’t aware of her serious skills, as she continues to distract with sexy poses.

For such a serious matter as Cham’s treason trial, the Legion is caught off-guard. How could they not be informed of (or care) what was happening with him – or is the snap trial standard in the 30th century?

Garth has taken a turn for the worse, which is a surprise after his seeming recovery from depression in the Annual. It’s not clear if Imra has been avoiding him (which seems unlikely, again based on the Annual) or is unaware of his deteriorating condition. Sister Ayla stays with her brother, but doesn't appear distressed over Imra’s absence.

We’re also reminded of the on-going problems of Matter-Eater Lad and Computo. Tasmia did seem a bit cavalier when she explained Danielle’s presence to Superboy, “Oh, that’s just Computo....”

Once again, she and Brin are caught in what appears to be a compromising situation but which is in fact quite innocent. Jan jumps to conclusions and criticizes Brin for trying to steal Garth’s wife. Brin himself hadn’t shown any sympathy for Cham, so there are bad feelings all around the HQ. There's no good time for Darkseid to appear, but the Legion is going into this menace on shaky ground.

Invisible Kid acquits himself admirably as a new Legionnaire. A bit of Superboy hero-worship, but he shows plenty of courage and skill for somebody who has been thrown into the deep end of the pool.

The tourism is a good touch to remind us that the Legionnaires are celebrities, but we’ve moved on from the statues and parades of the early Adventure days.


Holy Cats of Egypt!
#936365 - 08/22/17 09:17 AM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Fat Cramer]  
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Ann Hebistand Offline
Active
Ann Hebistand  Offline
Active

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Legion of Super-Heroes 290

I feel I should preface this review by explaining that my first encounter with the GDS was different than that of a lot of other Legion Worlders.

Firstly, I didn't read it between the ages of 8 and 13, or as a lapsed fan returning in my 20s or 30s. I read it as a jaded, cynical 22-year-old on the verge of quitting comics altogether (it WAS the mid-1990s,) more than a decade after it was first published. At the time, I was not much of a Legion fan, because I intensely disliked the TMK Legion, and while I'd tried the Postboot, it felt a little too fluffy and juvenile at the time (obviously, I wasn't reading it carefully enough, but I digress.) I'd bought a few 70s and 80s Legion issues, depending mainly on who had drawn them.

And the entire reason I even bothered with the GDS in the first place was because I'd already learned ahead of time that Darkseid was the villain. I didn't know much about the original Kirby New Gods stories, but I did know Darkseid from the final two seasons of Super Friends, where he had been memorably voiced by the great Frank Welker.

So GDS has no real sentimental value for me. With that in mind, I approached my current re-read of this first installment with as open a mind as I could, having been mostly impressed with the handful of monthly issues leading up to it.

I think it's pretty good. Levitz gets the action moving right away, for which he is to be commended, keeps the plot simple enough to be accessible, weaves in the subplots gingerly so that they're not disruptive, and does a smooth job with all the teases and clues.

Now, then, the Giffen/Mahlstedt art...(deep breath)...in a nutshell, I didn't like it in 1996, and I still don't like it now. But I didn't hate it then, either, nor do I hate it now. Except for a few interesting layouts, such as the impressive opening splash page with the Legionnaires going down the tube (no pun intended,) Giffen's pencils are just...there, very plain, bland, and derivative -- and so I still don't understand why it continues to be held up by Legion fandom at large as the Gold Standard of 80s Legion art. What is clearer than ever to me is that I really, really dislike Mahlstedt's style of inking here. It's like he's trying to imitate Terry Austin's style, but without understanding why Austin used the approaches he did. So what we get, in my view at least, is a lot of little bitty thin lines, and a lot of tiny details, but no feeling whatsoever of depth or solidity. This art is so flat and so wispy-looking, it almost threatens to fly off the page if the wind from my oscillating fan gets too close to the comic book.

Sooooo...qualified success in my opinion, then. But the big, big battle-sequences are yet to come, and Levitz always had a real talent for choreographing them, while Giffen could be very dynamic when he put in the extra effort. We shall see what I think of the remaining installments.

Originally Posted by Fat Cramer


Apart from the mystery of the servants&#146; mystical crime spree, life goes on for the Legion as they prepare for an election. Dream Girl&#146;s candidacy surprises other members although we&#146;ve seen how competent she is in the last few issues. Perhaps her teammates aren&#146;t aware of her serious skills, as she continues to distract with sexy poses.


That's our Nura! If her teammates insist on underestimating her, they do so at their own peril.

Originally Posted by Fat Cramer
Tasmia did seem a bit cavalier when she explained Danielle&#146;s presence to Superboy, &#147;Oh, that&#146;s just Computo....&#148;



Yeah, even for Preboot Tasmia, that's pretty cold. It might be the first indication that, as far as Tasmia's personality was concerned, Levitz didn't get the difference between "merely haughty" and "just plain mean."

#936393 - 08/22/17 12:57 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Fat Cramer]  
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 4,110
Dave Hackett Offline
Dave Hackett  Offline


Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 4,110
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada

Originally Posted by Fat Cramer
A team of Legionnaires, including new member Invisible Kid, investigates some destruction at the Museum of Mystic Arts. Suddenly, a dark figure breaks through a wall and commands them to serve the darkness, or else. This servant of darkness seeks a magical wand held by the Director, Steffanaci. He easily fells the Legionnaires as they attack; the wand is dropped and the servant leaves with it.


Pretty sure this is Matter Master's Metachem wand, isn't it?

Originally Posted by Fat Cramer

The dark being receives the Orb and gains still more power, deriding the servant, his son, who brought the Orb. He proclaims that it is time to take power from the living and dominate the universe with his darkness. The image of the son and the emerging figure make it pretty clear that the servant is Orion and the dark being, Darkseid.


Is it? I'll have to look again. Of course, when I read these as they came out, I had no idea who any of the New Gods or Darkseid were, so the ultimate reveal a few issues later was a bit of a head-scratcher, but didn't detract from the story. I know Darkseid's the selling point for later readers, but it always bugged me he's front and centre on the cover of all the collections, when the story itself is designed as a mystery.

#936394 - 08/22/17 01:54 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Ann Hebistand]  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 27,302
Paladin Online content
Paladin  Online Content


Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 27,302
The Underbelly of Society
Originally Posted by Ann Hebistand


Now, then, the Giffen/Mahlstedt art...(deep breath)...in a nutshell, I didn't like it in 1996, and I still don't like it now. But I didn't hate it then, either, nor do I hate it now. Except for a few interesting layouts, such as the impressive opening splash page with the Legionnaires going down the tube (no pun intended,) Giffen's pencils are just...there, very plain, bland, and derivative -- and so I still don't understand why it continues to be held up by Legion fandom at large as the Gold Standard of 80s Legion art. What is clearer than ever to me is that I really, really dislike Mahlstedt's style of inking here. It's like he's trying to imitate Terry Austin's style, but without understanding why Austin used the approaches he did. So what we get, in my view at least, is a lot of little bitty thin lines, and a lot of tiny details, but no feeling whatsoever of depth or solidity. This art is so flat and so wispy-looking, it almost threatens to fly off the page if the wind from my oscillating fan gets too close to the comic book.



This brings up something I wonder about some times: Is it really possible for me to be completely objective as an adult about stories and art that I loved as a child? I was right in that age range you described when I discovered the LSH and read the GDS off the stands, so I just have a love for the story and art imprinted on me. It's similar to how a lot of people hate Carmine Infantino's art on Star Wars, but I re-read it last year and still mostly love it. With Giffen the overall consensus is that fans loved his art up until it started to change around Omen & Prophet, which is mostly how I feel. I really don't know how I would feel about the art if I'd first discovered it as an adult the way I'm experiencing so many other Bronze Age artists for the first time these days.


Still "Lardy" to my friends!
#936397 - 08/22/17 02:06 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Paladin]  
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Ann Hebistand Offline
Active
Ann Hebistand  Offline
Active

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 528
Originally Posted by Paladin
Originally Posted by Ann Hebistand


Now, then, the Giffen/Mahlstedt art...(deep breath)...in a nutshell, I didn't like it in 1996, and I still don't like it now. But I didn't hate it then, either, nor do I hate it now. Except for a few interesting layouts, such as the impressive opening splash page with the Legionnaires going down the tube (no pun intended,) Giffen's pencils are just...there, very plain, bland, and derivative -- and so I still don't understand why it continues to be held up by Legion fandom at large as the Gold Standard of 80s Legion art. What is clearer than ever to me is that I really, really dislike Mahlstedt's style of inking here. It's like he's trying to imitate Terry Austin's style, but without understanding why Austin used the approaches he did. So what we get, in my view at least, is a lot of little bitty thin lines, and a lot of tiny details, but no feeling whatsoever of depth or solidity. This art is so flat and so wispy-looking, it almost threatens to fly off the page if the wind from my oscillating fan gets too close to the comic book.



This brings up something I wonder about some times: Is it really possible for me to be completely objective as an adult about stories and art that I loved as a child? I was right in that age range you described when I discovered the LSH and read the GDS off the stands, so I just have a love for the story and art imprinted on me. It's similar to how a lot of people hate Carmine Infantino's art on Star Wars, but I re-read it last year and still mostly love it. With Giffen the overall consensus is that fans loved his art up until it started to change around Omen & Prophet, which is mostly how I feel. I really don't know how I would feel about the art if I'd first discovered it as an adult the way I'm experiencing so many other Bronze Age artists for the first time these days.



That's a very good point, Lardy, and I'm glad you brought it up. There's nothing quite like the thrill of getting into something when it's fresh and new and exciting right off the stands, and I think that applies as much to art as well as writing. My own example would have to be the Epting Avengers era -- I felt at the time (1991-1994) that Epting's art -- particularly around the 350s, the early 360s, and his last four issues (372-275,) was the best of both the old school styles and the newer, more in-your-face approach. But other people at the time just didn't seem to get it -- the older fans would be like, "It's too Image-y!" and the Image fans would be like, "It looks too much like the way the old guys drew!" Whatever, I thought back then, your loss. But now almost 25 years have passed and every time I look at the best issues of that run, I still feel *exactly the same way.* So in, answer to your question, Lardy, no, I don't think it's possible for most people to be completely objective about their earliest superhero (or any other comic book genre) loves.

#936400 - 08/22/17 04:03 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
thoth lad Offline
Tempus Fugitive
thoth lad  Offline
Tempus Fugitive

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
Touring Bgtzl and Bgztl with M...
LoSH 290

A Servant of Darkness dominates the centre, and focus, of this cover. We have some Marvel-style hyperbole to the side of the logo. This was back in the days when multi issue epics weren’t as common as they would become. Back then, some of them were actually good. smile

To show that Darkness means business, there’s only rubble beneath the creature’s feet on an otherwise blank background. I wonder if anyone tried to get the Legion logo down there instead, or put it in the same rubble-like font. The book has to be identifiable easily on the racks though, so it’s one where commercial considerations trump the design. The rubble certainly shows the creature’s intentions though.

Legionnaires do make an appearance. They are trapped within the creature, who reminds me of the nebula formed cosmic entities from both major comic companies (well, Cos is on both hand and leg, making it look more projected onto it, but that’s artistic license smile ). This works on a number of levels. It shows our protagonists in peril and it highlights the return of Superboy. This reinforces, not only sales, but also backs up the hyperbole. It’s also a nod to the portals used as transportation by the villains.

Like the Annual, the servant isn’t recognisable as any particular one. This, and the lack of detail on Invisible Kid’s costume (and with his back turned), make me wonder if the cover had been completed well in advance of the annual. That would also support why so many of the subplots in the Annual get space, but without considerable progression. Not that the space wasn’t beneficial.

The saga starts with a very impressive splash page. The Legion arrives at a futuristic plaza. Smoke trails indicate that there’s action immediately ahead. So, no slow build up here. The perspective of the group looking down on several stories of concourses is just another example of Giffen’s ability to capture the reader’s attention. He even goes to the trouble of making sure there’s greenery in the structure, taking the Metropolis movie out of his futuristic metropolis.

It’s an interesting field team too (classic Swan formation of five in use). Superboy is present. We don’t see him having to travel through time. A few words from Wildfire to remind us are sufficient to remind us where he’s from. As for why, I imagine that the cold feeling he felt back in 1969 (in the Annual) may have brought him into the future. Something I’d not connected in previous reads. Like the servant being thumped by a Legion cruiser in the annual, I think everything ties up.

As per the cover, Superboy’s involvement also indicates something big ahead. The sparring between Wildfire and Superboy picks up seamlessly from a number of issues ago. It’s developed into a relationship that’s good for both people. Superboy needs someone to treat him as just another hero, and not as a teenage inspiration. The Livewire version of Lightning Lad would have a little of this many years later. The trail from Wildfire’s boots is a lovely visual use of his powers. Drake’s not dependant on a flight ring.

In contrast, Jacques is unsteady and in awe of Superboy. Phantom Girl is a sure and steady voice of experience and Cos gets to show off his new costume from the Annual. Blok would also lose the chains from his costume as of this issue, I think.

The team look through the debris of what survives of Disney in the 30th century. The Museum of Mystic Arts is on the site of the Magic Castle. A throwaway that seems like a certainty for a Disney/ Superpets cross over. Yet, because of Warner’s connection to DC, we’d end up getting a Looney Tunes/ Legion crossover instead smile

Antonio Stefanacci, our creative team’s idea of a Doctor Strange descendant, makes his first appearance as the curator. He has been protecting the Mentachem wand, an artefact that has survived from its 20th century creation and use by Flash villain Matter Master.

Stefanacci claims it’s the most powerful item in the inventory. However, on the top panel on page three, fanboy Keith Giffen has put in Doctor Fate’s costume and helm. The colouring of the helm isn’t right, making it tougher to spot. Giffen would add a few more Fate links to the Legion over time.

The mockery that was seeking the wand returns to claim it. The Legion don’t fare well against it. Superboy is swatted away and its dialogue suggests a link between creature Kryptonian.

Tinya can’t phase through the thing properly and passes out. I find that sort of thing as annoying as Dawny’s tracking powers giving out for Plot Purposes. There’s not much Jacques can do, and Wildfire has to hold back to prevent roasting both the newest Legionnaire and the curator. Jacques uses “cauchemar” in both his first adventure and in his last appearance in v7 #23. Thankfully Jacques’ dialogue doesn’t come with a translation in the same balloon. The mockery claims the wand, announces the fact to its omniscient master, and escapes through a Ploink Tube.

A single page conversation between Blok and Brainy, reintroduces the Mission Monitor Board as a key piece of Legion equipment. If only to let the reader know where everyone is. Blok is referred to a linguistics programme as he grapples with the concept of tourism. The scene acts as a link between the Computo Annual (that damage has to be explained for people who hadn’t picked it up) and the Chameleon Boy subplot. We are also introduced to Oliver Queen descendant Oli-3 Queen. He’ll have a part to play in a future story. Blok’s failure to grasp certain human things, and his colleague’s frustration would be a trend in issues to come. Considering the array of alien species Giffen draws, you’d have hoped for a bit more patience in the future.

Speaking of tourists, Superboy seems a little out of place in this version of 30th century Earth. He’s been there often enough and has had wide ranging adventures. That, and his super-science, should mean he’s not as wonder struck as is shown.

Timberwolf is present to see off Chameleon Boy, who is looking to clear his name. There’s real enmity from Brin here. With the move to Levitz’s subplot driven approach, conflicts build over time. This isn’t going to be a single-issue misunderstanding or a case of Space Mutiny. Timberwolf really doesn’t like the Durlan.

The Mentachem wand was the latest in a number of magical artefact thefts. Excalibur (from way back in Supergirl’s initiation to the Legion) has yet to be stolen and the team arrive in London (nice splash page as an introduction) just in time for another Servant to attack.

The team lose again, with the mockery managing to escape with the sword. This mockery has a connection with light, even as it serves darkness. Each mockery is individually visually striking, while retaining a theme. They have separate background connections while serving a single villain.

Invisible Kid makes his first foray into combat. He’s nervous, but brave. There’s a good Wildfire moment as he powers in to punch the mockery. It’s one of my favourite panels of him. This attack works and serves as a clue to the source of the servant. Conveniently, Superboy is helping save the tourists. He may have had some more success against this mockery than the last one.

The team are seen as celebrities both in this scene and in the scene where Oli-3 is showing tourists the HQ. It was a good move by the creative team to recognise the status this team would have after all of their victories. Flashes of this would be carried all the way through into the TMK run. Here, the autograph hunters get in the way of the mission.

Back at HQ, and Garth has been diagnosed with an electrical brain dysfunction. It’s quite fitting for his powers (and for the merging of his Proty guest personality). But it does seem a little like a cop out of dealing with some more serious issues.

Ever tearful Ayla is present, while Jan leaves to find Imra. She’s with Brin after a chance encounter. Imra is the one who is more aware of what happened on the asteroid, and of the moment that passed. But Brin knows enough to sulk after a few barbed comments from Jan. He’s leader, but Jan’s comments are catty and a far cry from any sensitive later portrayal. He’s not exactly team building here. After his comments to Cham, it’s nice to see Brin have to take his own medicine.

Garth has an electrical brain dysfunction affecting his reactions. Danielle was looked at by Brainy because of an energy overload to her nervous system. That was of interest to him, because Tenzil Kem suffered from similar effects. All a coincidence, or is there a Lost Legion story in there?

Brainy predicts that the next attack will be on Talok. It’s very convenient to have Brainy around when you need to move a plot forward. smile It appears that there have been thefts all across the galaxy, showing the range of our villain.

Talok means that Shadow Lass joins the field team. They encounter another Servant. This one says that it’s the least of the Servants. But it looks to kill Cosmic Boy all the same. It is captured after some smart work from Jacques. Although they lose the artefact (an orb that thankfully isn’t the Emerald Eye) to a mockery harnessing an “Astro-Force”, the Legion now have a prisoner.

The escaping Mockery returns to the dark world foreshadowed in recent issues, just past the Hanging Captions of Foreboding. It is called the most loyal of the servants and referred to as “son” It’s another big hint at the identity of the villain (not that I’d have known these ones when I first read it).

Jacques has been an important part of two of the three main scenes. It’s important for a fledgling character to get some panel time, without hogging it. Despite his more passive powers in the face of powerful villains, he is handled very well. Compare this to Blok, who didn’t get to take advantage of his earliest appearances as a Legionnaire.

The team return to HQ with their captured mockery. This segues into a scene showing us that there’s an election on the way. Element Lad, Ultra Boy and, to everyone’s surprise, Dream Girl are in the running.

Imra looks dejected at the meeting, and snaps at Wildfire and Mon El. Marte Allon interrupts with news of Chameleon Boy’s trial for the failed Khundian mission. Cham seems to be a little out of sight, out of mind to his colleagues at present. They seem a little surprised. Perhaps they were unaware that the UP Council itself would be handling the trial.

Both Superboy and Shadow Lass feel particularly uneasy around two of the creatures they have encountered. Their prisoner certainly disrupts the comatose Computo (still in Danielle’s body and a nice reminder of the annual to encourage readers to go and pick it up).

Having taken all the available power from artefacts, our Dark Master (shown earlier with human looking skin tones on his arms) is now going to target living entities. It’s nice he keeps his power grabbing checklist in easy categories. But who will he target and how will the Legion stop him?

There’s a lot going on in these issues, as Levitz and Giffen get into their stride after only a couple of stories. But the main plot is actually the three action set pieces against the Servants. Where the book already works well is in the pacing of these scenes and the way they interconnect to the other subplots. It gives the book a feeling of being an ongoing organic universe, rather than a series of more isolated scenes.

So, Superboy from the annual links into his appearance here; the Khundian mission subplots intertwine; Jan leaves one scene to interrupt another; Computo, who our villain had sent a servant to look at in the Annual, is disturbed by another servant here; Marte Allon links this issue with the Khundian plots and also her appearance in the Annual showing that the Legion operate in a wider universe. And so on.

There’s not much fat on any of the action scenes, which allows for the room to have the other subplots in the issue. All have a lovely introductory panel by Giffen. They all establish the goal of the villain and the links they have with some of the heroes.

Another point is that the Legion is responsive to the villain’s plans in each scene. After their first encounter, they are already looking to see where they will strike next. Brainy uses that information to figure out Talok as another likely location. It might have been nice to see a glimpses of other field teams out there at alternate sites, as shown when the team were looking for the missing Khundian mission and rescue teams.

But, in principle, it shows that it’s a team of thinkers as well as fighters. It’s what Mon El told Jacques in the annual. There’s a battle of wits for the Legion in this story, as raw power alone won’t be enough. It makes a very nice change. Jacques suggestion to identify the villain would also develop over this, and the next couple of issues.

The power of the villains is another reason to keep the action scenes brief. Only transuits seem to have protected a couple of the Legionnaires here. Any longer could have led to fatalities. There’s something additionally creepy in having servants of such power be scavengers of artefacts.

Finally, I should really point out how much I still enjoy the colouring in the old issues. Carl Gafford was an important part of making the 30th century a visual treat. Just as Patterson/ Mahlstedt have been keeping the consistency just right, where Giffen looks to express different influences just a little.


"...not having to believe in a thing to be interested in it and not having to explain a thing to appreciate the wonder of it."
#936402 - 08/22/17 05:48 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: thoth lad]  
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 4,110
Dave Hackett Offline
Dave Hackett  Offline


Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 4,110
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Originally Posted by thoth lad


Finally, I should really point out how much I still enjoy the colouring in the old issues. Carl Gafford was an important part of making the 30th century a visual treat. Just as Patterson/ Mahlstedt have been keeping the consistency just right, where Giffen looks to express different influences just a little.


I agree that DC colourists did amazing things during this period (Swamp Thing was another book that worked the colour superbly for the medium), BUT I will say that the restored/redone colours of the Deluxe Edition are downright gorgeous. Everything looks so good, and certain things like the yellow glow around Wildfire's fist, really pop. The drawback is that the improved colours and paper detract slightly from Giffen's "Face Shadow" technique which look more textured in newsprint, but a little off in the DE.

Loved this issue as a kid and still love it now, lots going on, and still lots to learn (at the time). Don't know much about Dream Girl, and Ultra Boy seems too much like those Tom Cruise-esque macho jerk action stars young me hated so much in the movies, so I'm sticking with Jan and will vote accordingly. Except I won't, because American postage is a little expensive and I'm saving up for something or other.

Even in hindsight, I still disagree with FC and don't see Orion/Darkseid on the last page, but the Astro-Harness on pages 19 & 20 is a dead giveaway.

This issue also contains the WORST page in the GDS, which is #15. In the top panel, the Master is revealed completely except for his face, wearing a purple costume, with clearly Caucasian arms and chest exposed. Young me will spend the next several months staring at that panel to try and figure out who has a costume like that, only to discover later that Darkseid looks NOTHING like this. All these years later I'm still baffled at what they were trying to do here (Also, the Kalibak clone is hairless)..

#936445 - 08/23/17 04:41 PM Re: Re-Reading the Legion: Archives Volume 18 [Re: Future]  
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
thoth lad Offline
Tempus Fugitive
thoth lad  Offline
Tempus Fugitive

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 18,522
Touring Bgtzl and Bgztl with M...
Originally Posted by Cramer
if the master calls them mockeries, the master must be very fearsome indeed.


When I first read this, I probably thought that the mockery tag was because they were mockeries of life, rather than mockeries of particular heroes. Can’t be sure, but reading “mockeries” even now still gives me that impression.

Originally Posted by Cramer
I think we’re further misled by the silhouette of the master, quite lean, with a very large collar; it just doesn’t look like Darkseid.


The bare arms was a change for him too smile

Mock-Orion: Master! I have returned with Felix Faust’s Fondue Set!
Villain: Gah! You have returned too soon! >leaps out of bath for next panel appearance in a bathrobe and bunny slippers.

I think there was an earlier panel where you could see his distinctive head gear. (hah! not getting me to type “distinctive helmet”…bah!) But he has been shown inconsistently as have the mockeries.

Originally Posted by Cramer
(BTW, where did Superboy come from (so to speak)? Is Levitz doing a test run to gauge how much readers want the Boy of Steel back in the Legion on a regular basis?)


In the annual, he felt a chill of something ominous. I think he got to thinking about visiting old friends as a result. It’s as near a guess as I’ve got smile

Originally Posted by Cramer
There’s a nice nod to the early Legion with the explanation of how Excalibur was found by Supergirl, which apparently still hadn’t been verified as the true Excalibur at the time it was stolen.


It was a nice touch. I probably thought the use of it a little silly on the first reading, but this time round I was a little sorry to see it go. Still, the spirit of Albion must reside somewhere. Arise King Lad!

Originally Posted by Cramer
Perhaps her teammates aren’t aware of her serious skills, as she continues to distract with sexy poses.


I’ve noticed that in the future, sexy poses seem to involve putting your knee on top of consoles. Jeckie did the same thing a while back. There’s probably Console Clubs dotted around the UP for this sort of thing.

Originally Posted by Cramer
For such a serious matter as Cham’s treason trial, the Legion is caught off-guard. How could they not be informed of (or care) what was happening with him – or is the snap trial standard in the 30th century?


I thought they’d be a bit more in the loop too. Could the others have a more professional relationship with their head of espionage, than a friendly one? In a much later volume I remember Vi saying she’d never been in his HQ apartment for example.

Originally Posted by Cramer
Garth has taken a turn for the worse, which is a surprise after his seeming recovery from depression in the Annual.


That’s a good observation. That was just the sort of scene that should have been the turning point for his condition.

Originally Posted by Cramer
Sister Ayla stays with her brother, but doesn't appear distressed over Imra’s absence.


Imra was just down the corridor to be fair. Probably off to get Ayla some more tissues. smile

Continued...


"...not having to believe in a thing to be interested in it and not having to explain a thing to appreciate the wonder of it."
Page 5 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Monitor Duty
Forum Statistics
Forums14
Topics20,206
Posts947,370
Legionnaires1,680
Most Online226
Aug 31st, 2017
Newest Legionnaires
Cyberstrike, Sparky54, Dunnomo, Brainwise, truce57
1680 Registered Legionnaires
Today's Birthdays
JT.Hawk
Time Bubble
Holo-Vids
21CL Shrinking Violet
Catalyst Queen for Legion AU Project
Color Kid by Jay Fosgitt
Roll Call
Nick Vinson
Nick Vinson
Texas
Posts: 266
Joined: April 2006
Show All Member Profiles 
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0